A Long Walk Home

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This photograph was taken in Fitzroy Crossing sometime in the early 1980s when there was a significant flood of the Fitzroy River. I love the angles in the photo and the shimmer of the water on the road. I can see it on the cover of a story about a young boy walking home …

Can you think of any other titles that might suit the picture?

Cheers

Lorraine 🙂

 

Reading and writing

This weekend I am attending a two-day course in Bunbury to become a tutor in the Read, Write Now program in my community. I am really looking forward to it. It is four days training in total, presented over two weekends. I have been a literacy tutor in the past and enjoyed the experience greatly.

People who cannot read or write (in their first or second language) are at a real disadvantage. I became aware of this in the 1980’s when I was living in Fitzroy Crossing in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. It was election time and information was only available in a written format in English. Many of the adult Indigenous people had limited English language skills and tended to make their decisions based on the friendliness and rapport of whatever politician was visiting at the time. It struck me as being very unfair.

This experience prompted me to work with the local people to help improve their reading and writing. It was the first time I became aware of how much I enjoy reading and writing and determined to use these skills in my life and in my career. That insight has impacted on many decisions over the years and I am excited to be going back to where I started with the Adult Literacy program.

cheers

Lorraine

Flights of fancy

7 posts to go until I reach 500 posts!IMG_0029From 1988 to 1993 I lived in Newman in the Pilbara region of Western Australia. I was successful in winning a position on the East Pilbara Shire Council. It was a great training ground for my future employment plus I had a great time.

 

Newman is the biggest community in the East Pilbara Shire but it didn’t have a dedicated Council Chamber for meetings. We often met at meeting rooms in the Recreational Centre. In fairness to the distant parts of the region we often had meetings at the smaller communities, one of which is Marble Bar. The township was gazetted in 1893. Surprisingly, Marble Bar had full Council facilities including a Chamber for Council meetings. It was good to sit around a “proper” table!

 

I was the first ever female to sit on the Council. The population of the Shire included local pastoral stations, mining employees and local Indigenous Communities.

 

The picture above is of the Marble Bar airport. Just as well I love flying in small planes. We also had meetings at Nullagine, Telfer (a closed mining town) and Shay Gap (before the town-site was demolished). It was a great experience and taught me a lot about regional development and the complexities of trying to address the differing needs of groups within our communities.

 

cheers

 

Lorraine

 

 

Weekly photo challenge: Culture

IMG_1030 IMG_1031 IMG_1032 IMG_1034My focus today is on Indigenous Australian culture. I lived in a remote Indigenous Community (Numbulwar, Northern Territory) and in Fitzroy Crossing in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. The woven basket is from Numbulwar. The featured book includes a story about The Brolga and the Emu told by Wingathana, who was my son’s school teacher in Grade 1 (1980) in Numbulwar.

The didgeridoo and boomerangs are from Fitzroy Crossing. The one with the almost 90 degree bend is, I believe, called a killing stick and is used for hunting kangaroos.

The dot painting originated in Laverton in the Northern Goldfields region of Western Australia.

The egg is actually and Emu egg and it has the face of an Indigenous man etched on its surface. I am unsure where the artist was from.

I hope you enjoyed my choice this week for Culture :-). They are quite unique artifacts purchased from the maker and won’t be found in commercial outlets. They may not be as pretty as what is available in the souvenir shops however they are the real thing!

cheers

Lorraine