Legacy and Learning

microscopic view

I love learning new things. My most recent ‘new thing’ is learning how to write feature articles. It is online learning through the Australian Writers Centre. It is a great course and I am getting a lot out of it.

One exercise was to interview a fellow student and write a profile about them. I paired up with Miranda from Queensland and we agreed to a Skype interview. We stuck to the ten minutes recommended and it was really interesting.

Miranda emailed me after the Skype session and asked if she could interview me again about what ‘legacy’ meant to me. I had a few days to think about it. I became aware of how little thought I had given to what my legacy is, or would be, after I am gone.

If you would like to read what Miranda wrote, here is the link to her site and the article Red Hat Chronicles. 

I hope you enjoy it and maybe think a little about what your legacy might be :-).

 

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Aha moment! Being grateful for small things …

I sometimes make the mistake of looking for BIG things to happen to get excited about. Today I am reflecting on the many small things I enjoy each day, week or month – and there are many!

Gratitude

What do you like to talk about?

The idea for this post came from some questions raised by Eric Tonningsen‘s blog Awakening to Awareness.

So, what do you like to talk about? I don’t mean the casual exchanges and polite conversations with people who pass through our lives.

I have a real desire for deep and meaningful conversations – usually in a one on one situation. I like to think about possibilities for our shared future. I search for answers to the questions about why we still go to war knowing the enormous costs – especially to loss of life, property and our shared interests and history.

I also love talking to children aged from about three years old and above. I love the simplicity of how they see the world and I marvel and how much a child can see from such an early age.

It is also good to hear the wisdom of people who have lived a long life without becoming embittered by it. There is so much we can learn from our elders.

People who have hit rock bottom in their lives can also have a great clarity about what is important and how to do it – or at least where to start that journey.

Issues such as euthanasia, the death penalty, the customs and beliefs of other cultures and religions are also stimulating topics. I do not like to argue and very much believe in the philosophy of ‘live and let live’. I can sustain a conversation with someone whose views are totally different than mine and accept that they have the right to believe as they choose. I also hope others will offer me the same respect.

Scientific topics are interesting but my depth of knowledge is limited. I try to keep an open mind. I also  hope the scientists will keep an open mind as well and not defend their ideas for the sake of protecting a point of view. Science itself is evolving and we learn new things each day and sometimes dispose of past beliefs in the process.

I also like to listen to good jokes. I am not very good at telling them though 🙂DSC00512

 

Which story has most appeal?

As part of my studies I need to further develop some stories. I would really appreciate your feedback. Thanks 🙂

SYNOPSIS – FANTASY
The Magic Tunnel

A little four-year-old girl finds a magical world just beyond Grandma’s back fence. Only Lindy knows the secret entrance. A blue wren whispered it in her ear and made her promise to keep it secret – even from Grandma. Lindy carefully lifts one of the pavers on the patio and jumps into the beautiful rainbow tunnel. The bright colours swirl like a kaleidoscope until Lindy reaches the giant rainbow coloured bubble. This is her secret, best ever, place to be. She is safe there and everything is beautiful and kind. The blue wrens also live in the bubble and they tell Lindy about all the bush creatures while they sit around a little table having a tea party.

SYNOPSIS – NON-FICTION
The Pros and Cons of Lifestyle Villages

The ageing of baby boomers is influencing many aspects of Australian life in the 21st Century with many people aged over 45 and over 55 moving into a Lifestyle or Retirement Villages. This is a big decision with lasting consequences financially, socially and health wise.The writer currently resides in a Lifestyle Village in Busselton and brings her personal observations to the fore. This book also draws on Australian and international research to substantiate its claims. Areas covered include the following chapters:
1. What are the financial implications of moving to a retirement village and what is a lifetime lease?
2. What legislation is relevant to Retirement Villages in Western Australia
3. Age considerations – when is the best time to make the move?
4. What are the expectations, and how does reality measures up?
5. Case studies with divergent points of view
6. Links to resources and further information

CULTURE SHOCK – FICTION
Up- side- down in the Northern Territory

John and Raelene live in the idyllic rain forest environment of Belgrave, in the Dandenong Ranges on the outskirts of Melbourne with their two young children, Nigel and Belinda. A unique opportunity arises, tempting them to give up all that is familiar and move to Arnhem Land in the Northern Territory for John to take up a position as Store Manager for the remote Indigenous community of Numbulwar. The Community Store, owned and operated by an Anglican Mission, is in transition of ownership to the Indigenous Corporation. The township has around five hundred Indigenous people and around a dozen non-Aboriginal people who hold positions in health, education, plus the Store Manager. With no previous experience working with Indigenous people and no training provided, they quickly discover they are way out of their depth. As culture shock takes hold, they begin to question everything they once believed about their values and ideals. This is the story of  their enlightenment.

 

Torn …

Today I was thinking about the times when we are torn between two people, two job options, a parent and child, to diet or not, two roads …

The more I thought about it I realised that just about every moment we are having to choose which way to go. It is in navigating these choices that makes our journey what it is. It can be a pretty uncomfortable place to be if our loyalties are being tugged in different directions. Especially if you are trying to keep everyone happy :-).

I guess it is one of those Universal feelings we all experience from time to time.

Daily Prompt: I walk the line

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Have you got a code you live by? What are the principles or set of values you actively apply in your life?

  • live and let live is my number one guide to living day-to-day
  • my family and friends are my highest priorities
  • people are more important than things
  • perfection is over-rated
  • look after what you have and you will be rewarded with greater blessings
  • consider, ‘how important is it, in the scheme of things?’
  • some people need a little more support than others to meet a similar outcome
  • it is better to say nothing than to say something hurtful
  • all people have the potential for good
  • love can heal many sorrows but not all of them
  • create good memories each day you live
  • remember the person next to you may have a bundle of troubles you cannot see – be compassionate always
  • remember to smile as it may brighten someone else’s day and your own
  • sometimes the best advice you can give is to remain silent and listen
  • forgive others who may of hurt you – it may turn their lives around and you will feel better too
  • music is good for the soul as is nature
  • accept the things I cannot change and change the things I can.

How is that for starters? Do you have any you would like to add to the list?

The Karrakatta Club

I first met Patricia Sanders purely by accident. We both happened to be in the same place at the same time – the City of Claremont Council Museum. I was seeking information about my great-grandfather, James King, who was the first Lord Mayor of the Claremont Council. Patricia and my Mum were first cousins. Her mother, Mabel King and my Grandfather, Arthur King, were brother and sister and children of James and Elizabeth King.

Patricia Sanders 001 (Copy)There are a number of King family descendants in Western Australia but I had no knowledge of them until that day. Patricia graciously invited me to a family event in Fremantle and I met many distant and not so distant relatives. It was a wonderful experience. Patricia was around 90 years old when I met her. She was still in good health and living independently at a retirement village in a good suburb of Perth. She had written her memoirs, As I Recall It, and she led a truly amazing life.

She called me one day and invited me to attend an event at the Karrakatta Club in Perth city. I had never heard of it before but I went along and it was a memorable experience for me. Here is some information about the Club from their website …

The Karrakatta Club was the first women’s club in Australia, and was founded in 1894 by members of the St George’s Reading Circle, at the suggestion of Dr Emily Ryder, an American medical woman who visited Perth at that time. Dr Ryder had been present at a meeting of the St George’s Reading Circle to which some twelve women belonged, and was so impressed by their interest in books and their powers of discussion that she persuaded them to form a club along the lines of the Education Clubs for Women in America.

The objective of the Club was to bring into one body the women of the community for mutual improvement and social engagement. The first President was Lady Madeleine Onslow, and it is due to her outstanding qualities that the Club grew and prospered.

In 1972/73 the Australian Association of Lyceum Clubs was formed to link all Lyceum Clubs in Australia under one banner. The aim of The AALC is to promote a spirit of goodwill and understanding within the Association, and to enhance the enjoyment of Lyceum by providing support.

It was wonderful to be there with Patricia and meet some of the other members – many of whom were descended from the early pioneers of Western Australia. I noticed there were some rules to abide by and these, loosely translated,  included:

  • no talking about your health
  • no religion
  • no politics

I think they might have been onto something!

Unfortunately I lost contact with Patricia and I do believe she passed away in her early nineties. An amazing woman. She was my only link to the King family in Western Australia. I hope some family members may have a reunion one day and I will meet up with them once again.

About winning friends and influencing people

I think most  people today have at least heard of Dale Carnegie. I found a copy of Dale Carnegie’s Golden Book in my office. For more detailed info on The Dale Carnegie Training Institute CLICK HERE.

Esperance WA

Esperance WA

The Golden Book is really a compact (gold in colour) brochure with some of his key writings included. Probably his best known book is How to Win Friends and Influence People.

Here are some of the tips included in his book:

1. Don’t criticize, condemn or complain

2. Give honest, sincere appreciation

3. Arouse in the other person an eager want

4. Become genuinely interested in other people

5. Smile

6. Remember that a person’s name is to that person the sweetest and most important sound in any language

7. Be a good listener. Encourage others to talk about themselves.

8. Talk in terms of the other person’s interests

9. Make the other person feel important – and do it sincerely.

Dale Carnegie was born in 1888 and lived until 1955.

Do you think his advice is still relevant today? Are there other suggestions that could be added to the list, in your opinion?

Alternatively, which one, out of the nine points, do you most relate to?

Cheers

Lorraine