2019 and all that …

I am thinking about next year and where to focus my interest and my energies. I am not one for New Year’s resolutions or for setting goals but I like to pause and consider what I want to include or change in my year ahead.

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

2018 was a pretty good year for me. It was very busy and enjoyable year with my U3A (University of the Third Age) commitments. It was one of those years where, at times, I became more of a human-doing rather than a human-being.

For the year ahead I would like to give more attention to my relationships with people in my life. I have moved around a fair bit in my life and have often lost touch with people in the process. I grew up in Victoria and have now lived in West Australia for 36 years. I have lived in the Kimberley region, Pilbara region, MidWest/Gascoyne region, Perth, Goldfields/Esperance region and now the South West. Each time I moved I had to start again and make new friends and set up new networks. It gets to the point that I get itchy feet if I stay in one place too long.

I think 2019 will be about putting down some roots, building relationships and accepting we are here to stay. And being grateful that I can enjoy life in such a pleasant environment.

Photo Busselton Jetty by Milz on Pexels.com

What do you do when you are bored?

boredomSo, boredom – what is it? I rarely say that I am bored as there are so many options of what to do. But there are some days that I don’t feel inclined towards any of my options.

Recently I have brought together a small group of people around my age who are no longer working full-time. Last week we talked about what we hoped to do in retirement or semi-retirement and then reflected on what it is REALLY like. Most people expressed at least some of the following concerns:

  • Fear of not keeping up with what is happening in the workplace eg technology
  • Running out of ideas on how to fill the day (after doing the house and garden until it is perfect)
  • Loss of interaction with other people
  • Loss of identity now that we cannot be defined by our jobs
  • Feeling guilty that we should be happier not working
  • How long does the money have to last?
  • Too much time for contemplation
  • Lack of boundaries that we forced on us when we were working

I am aware that there seems to be little support or training to prepare people for retirement. There is always a big emphasis about the financial side but not as much about the social aspects.

There is the good side as well – I haven’t focused on that in this post. I think we would all agree that not having to set the alarm to get up early for work is the number ONE bonus of not working full-time 🙂

Encore Careers Australia

BLUE 013I recently wrote a post about making the transition from full-time work to a different lifestyle. You can see the original post here The Third Age

I have since decided to start a new blog about, and dedicated to, those of us who are past 50 and wondering how best to use our time for the next few decades.

My new blog is Encore Australia and you are very welcome to visit and leave any thoughts or comments on the site. I have also found some links that you may find of interest. I hope it will be a lively and interactive site that stimulates ideas and opportunities.

This is not a business venture and there is nothing for sale – it is for sharing ideas and inspiration.

Calling on “baby boomers”

Are you retiring soon or thinking of retiring? Or are you just reflecting on what lies ahead of you? I am really interested to hear from you about what your major concerns are as you look towards retirement and the inevitability of getting older.

I am considering developing some workshops for people in this age group ie 50+. If you have gone through, or are going through the phase of elderly or unwell parents, it can become an overwhelming and depressing time. Have you ever thought “Is this all I have to look forward to?”

I want to find out what are the important factors in ageing well. I expect that good health and financial security are a good start. But what does “financial security” really mean? Some people can live on around $15,000 per year whereas some others couldn’t do it on less than $70,000 per year.

How do we plan for our retirement when we don’t know how long that will be for? So many times I hear people say “If only I knew how long my money had to last!”

And then  the problem of “who am I if I am not working” now that I cannot define myself by my job. This can be a real-time of identity crisis. What can be done to aid people (us) through this period in a more positive way?

I am meeting with another woman in about a week’s time to discuss these ideas (she has just undertaken some work for the local council to identify what seniors want in their community). I figure that if these questions are important to me, then it’s fair to assume they may ring true for other baby boomers as well. I would greatly value

the times are changing

your opinion please.

Please feel free to just send me one or two points that you think are important. Alternatively you can disagree with the idea that anything needs to be done.

Thanks, in anticipation

Lorraine