Weekly photo challenge: Extra

Too much rain can have devastating consequences. These photos were taken during a wet season in Fitzroy Crossing in the early 1980’s while I was living there. People were cut off from food supplies, the bore pumps were flooded and ironically there was a shortage of water for household use. One of my neighbours was bitten by a venomous snake and had to be driven through the flood water to get medical help. I wouldn’t go outside to the clothes line as I heard something splashing in the flood water and was worried it could be a crocodile. After some time, the floods subsided and the big job of fixing the infrastructure began – until the next big rains!

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Which story has most appeal?

As part of my studies I need to further develop some stories. I would really appreciate your feedback. Thanks 🙂

SYNOPSIS – FANTASY
The Magic Tunnel

A little four-year-old girl finds a magical world just beyond Grandma’s back fence. Only Lindy knows the secret entrance. A blue wren whispered it in her ear and made her promise to keep it secret – even from Grandma. Lindy carefully lifts one of the pavers on the patio and jumps into the beautiful rainbow tunnel. The bright colours swirl like a kaleidoscope until Lindy reaches the giant rainbow coloured bubble. This is her secret, best ever, place to be. She is safe there and everything is beautiful and kind. The blue wrens also live in the bubble and they tell Lindy about all the bush creatures while they sit around a little table having a tea party.

SYNOPSIS – NON-FICTION
The Pros and Cons of Lifestyle Villages

The ageing of baby boomers is influencing many aspects of Australian life in the 21st Century with many people aged over 45 and over 55 moving into a Lifestyle or Retirement Villages. This is a big decision with lasting consequences financially, socially and health wise.The writer currently resides in a Lifestyle Village in Busselton and brings her personal observations to the fore. This book also draws on Australian and international research to substantiate its claims. Areas covered include the following chapters:
1. What are the financial implications of moving to a retirement village and what is a lifetime lease?
2. What legislation is relevant to Retirement Villages in Western Australia
3. Age considerations – when is the best time to make the move?
4. What are the expectations, and how does reality measures up?
5. Case studies with divergent points of view
6. Links to resources and further information

CULTURE SHOCK – FICTION
Up- side- down in the Northern Territory

John and Raelene live in the idyllic rain forest environment of Belgrave, in the Dandenong Ranges on the outskirts of Melbourne with their two young children, Nigel and Belinda. A unique opportunity arises, tempting them to give up all that is familiar and move to Arnhem Land in the Northern Territory for John to take up a position as Store Manager for the remote Indigenous community of Numbulwar. The Community Store, owned and operated by an Anglican Mission, is in transition of ownership to the Indigenous Corporation. The township has around five hundred Indigenous people and around a dozen non-Aboriginal people who hold positions in health, education, plus the Store Manager. With no previous experience working with Indigenous people and no training provided, they quickly discover they are way out of their depth. As culture shock takes hold, they begin to question everything they once believed about their values and ideals. This is the story of  their enlightenment.

 

Antony Gormley

In 2003 I went to Lake Ballard near Menzies, north of Kalgoorlie in remote Western Australia. A rather unique exhibition was on display on the salt lake known as Lake Ballard. The sculptures by Antony Gormley, were placed on site in 2003 just before I visited and stay as a tourist attraction in the region. See the Wiki link below 🙂

To learn more about Lake Ballard and Antony Gormley CLICK HERE

Weekly photo challenge: Beginning

Today I was watering my garden when I noticed a new leaf on one of my Canna lilies. I always love to see new life unfolding in nature.

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There is a bit of a story about my Canna lilies. When I was a child we had them growing along the front fence of our home. Now I was a child that hated school and was fairly creative at finding ways to avoid it. One strategy was that I would say goodbye to Mum and head of in the direction of my school but then I would creep back home using the Canna lilies as camouflage .

I would slip back quietly into the house and back into bed. My Mum would discover me there some time later and would not be happy! “What are you doing there? I thought you had gone to school!” I usually came up with “I am not feeling very well.” Because my Mum was a nurse, and a kind person, she let me get away with it.

So isn’t it amazing how the memory works. I see Canna lilies and in my mind I can see myself avoiding another day at school :-). I bought my lilies recently because of my childhood memories.

cheers

Lorraine

 

Christmas Pudding

My mother-in-law taught me how to make Christmas Pudding in the way she prepared and cooked it every year for her husband and two sons. The responsibility was passed to me when she passed away in 2010. Each year I say I am not going to make it but I usually give in to howls of protests.

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The tradition of putting the coins in the puddings comes from my childhood. I have 15 x three-penny coins dating from 1921 to 1955. I also have seven six-penny coins dating from 1910 to 1963. I always clean them in boiling water and bicarb soda before mixing them in the pudding! I usually ask the coins be swapped for some chocolate money so as I can continue the tradition the next Christmas.

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Next the mixture goes in two pudding bowls and sealed with kitchen paper and foil before inserting into two pots of boiling water.

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Then they steam for four hours. I need to keep topping up the water so it does all disappear 🙂

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Good morning

Rob O'Halloran

When I saw the topic for today’s photo challenge I immediately thought of this photo of my brother Robert. It was taken around 1965-66. I was still in primary school and I think Rob was doing a mechanical apprenticeship. He loved his sleep and used to look a REAL SIGHT when he first woke up.

I insisted in taking this photo with him carrying my school bag on his shoulder. I think I took the photo on an old box brownie camera – that was all we had then. I loved the way that he went along with the idea of catching him first thing in the morning just as he rolled out of bed.

Rob passed away suddenly  in September 2008, aged fifty-seven. He always enjoyed a good laugh! Even at his funeral there were lots of tales of incidents from his life where we remembered him with a smile. He was well-loved by family and friends.

cheers

Lorraine

 

Gnomesville Massacre

This week we had a short break at a Farm Stay in Ferguson Valley – about one hour’s drive from home. It is situated just down the road from Gnomesville. Last year Gnomesville received international attention with the following article on NBC News –  NBC News Gnomesville Massacre.

Vandals smashed their way through this special little community – heads were broken off and several gnomes were smashed. The State Emergency Service Volunteer President spoke to the media about this tragic event.

A few years before the massacre, a local Ferguson Valley woman saw the first gnome appear out of nowhere. At this time the locals were very concerned about changes to the road layout and many protested against the changes. That’s when the gnome population greatly increased and  joined their silent protest about the road changes. Today a roundabout manages the traffic at the intersection and it is said that the gnomes love to go round and round! Read the history of Gnomesville on their website.

I can share some photos I took this week. Word has spread that it is bad luck to injure a gnome and they are receiving more respect from visitors now 🙂

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Cheers

Lorraine

Forty plus shades of green

In contrast to yesterday’s post on the Pilbara region of Western Australia, I thought it was time for some GREEN instead or red and brown countryside!

Our trip to Ireland was partly to explore where the O’Halloran family originated from. My research found that Killaloe in County Clare has records of the O’Halloran family going back to about 1100. For more info about Killaloe, see the following link:  Killaloe, County Clare

In Ireland we mainly spent our time in Galway, County Clare and Dublin. I loved the countryside and the people. We had some problems finding our way around though and got lost several times. We also copped an excess baggage fee of around $100 from Ryan Airways. The airfare was cheap but maybe that is how they make up the difference 🙂

Cheers

Lorraine